The Greatest Science Stories Never Told: 100 tales of Invention and Discovery to Astonish, Bewilder, & Stupify

The Greatest Science Stories Never Told: 100 tales of Invention and Discovery to Astonish, Bewilder, & Stupify

By Rick Beyer

9780061686968

Beyer, R. 2009. The greatest science stories never told: 100 tales of invention and discovery to astonish, bewilder, and stupefy. NY: HarperCollins.

Summary

Brought to us by the network that continually surprises us with history facts comes a book that reveals many facts about science (invention, anatomy, space, electricity, etc.) that are surprising. The book is organized by year, from 265 BC to 2004, with each fact written as a small narrative illustrated by related photographs and drawings.

Quantitative Summary:

Readability Formula        Grade

Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level          5.2

Gunning-Fog Score         8.8

Coleman-Liau Index        11.1

SMOG Index      6.4

Automated Readability Index     4.6

Average Grade Level      7.2

(http://readability-score.com)

Qualitative Summary:

This is one of those books that inspires further research through brief encounters with very interesting non-fictional narratives. It spans the STEM discipline, with stories focusing heavily on inventors and inventing (Motorola music, telephones, vacuums to name a few), naturalists, anatomy, and outer space.  It gives just enough information on each fact to inspire interest, but not enough to serve as a definitive reference source. The chronology is straightforward, with years written at the tops of the pages and going forward in time. There is no singular character to this book to follow, and the knowledge requirement is rather

Curriculum Ties

Great jump off points for high school papers on inventors and inventions.

Standards

MD CCSS

State Curriculum

Technology Ed 9-12

Indicator Statement:

Develop an understanding of the role of society in the development and use of technology. (ITEA, STL 6)

7

Objective(s):

Explain that throughout history, new technologies have resulted from the demands, values, and interests of individuals, businesses, and societies. (ITEA, STL 6-D)

Explain that the use of inventions and innovations has led to changes in society and the creation of new needs and wants. (ITEA, STL 6-E)

Explain that social and cultural priorities and values are reflected in technological devices. (ITEA, STL 6-F)

Explain that meeting societal expectations is the driving fore behind the acceptance and use of products and systems. (ITEA, STL 6-G)

Explain that social and cultural priorities and values are reflected in technological devices.

Identify historical examples of human innovation in the areas of food production, clothing, and self-defense.

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

by Jonathan Safran Foer

Foer, J. S. 2006. Extremely loud and incredibly close. Mariner Books: NY.

ISBN 978-0-618-71165-9

Summary

Oskar Schell is a precocious nine year old living in New York City with his mother and father. He and his father share a love for elaborate scavenger hunts, and his father created hunts that lead Oskar on many adventures. When Oskar’s father is killed in the attacks on the Twin Towers, Oskar is devastated. He finds one final clue that his father left for him, a key. Knowing that it must unlock something important, this clue leads him on a long adventure across the five boroughs of New York, bringing him in touch with many characters, always searching for what his father left behind for him.

Quantitative Summary:

Lexile: 940L

ATOS Book Level: 4.7

Interest Level:   Upper Grades (UG 9-12)

Qualitative Summary:

The structure of this book is very complex, switching between narrators and narratives, and skipping in between different chronologies. This is a trademark of Johnathan Safran Foer’s books which are often considered to be art pieces as well as fiction. There are also complex stylistic choices such as text that gets smaller and runs together, as well as various illustrations and visiual representations of symbols in the book. It is a complex read that I think would be best suited for older high school level.

Curriculum ties:

US History could use this book to illustrate 9/11 narratives. English could use this as examples of symbolism and poetic language, as well as the experimentation with the novel form and language, similar to books like A Clockwork Orange.

Standards

Objective 1.2.1: The student will determine the contributions of literary elements in classical and contemporary literary texts. ECLG 1.2.1, ADP H
Grades 9 and 10
The student will
 Determine the significance of the following as each contributes to the meaning of a text: 
o plot sequence of events (including foreshadowing and flashback), cause-and-effect relationships, and events 
that are exposition, climax or turning point, resolution* ECLG 1.2.1, ADP H4
o characters’ defining traits, motivations, and developments throughout the text* ECLG 1.2.1, ADP H4
o details that provide clues to the setting, the mood created by the setting, and the role the setting plays in the text* ECLG 1.2.1
o conflicts that motivate characters and those that serve to advance the plot* ECLG 1.2.1
o the perspective of the author or speaker as well as the effects of first or third person narration and multiple narrators within and across text(s)* ECLG 1.2.1
o narration, dialogue, dramatic monologue, asides, soliloquies, and character foils ADP H4 o various literary devices, including figurative language, imagery, allegory, and symbolism
 Identify the specific structural elements of particular literary forms (e.g., short story, novel, drama, poetry, essay, biography, autobiography, journalistic writing, film) ECLG 1.1.5, ADP H3 
Grades 11 and 12
The student will
 Analyze characters’ motivations, actions, and development as they relate to the experiences, emotions, moral dilemmas and ambiguities in a work of literature ADP H8 
 Analyze how voice, persona, and the choice of narrator affect the characterization, mood, tone, plot and credibility of a text 
 Analyze the contribution of dramatic monologue, chorus, asides, soliloquies, and character foils to the development of character, plot, and theme ADP H6 

 Analyze the characteristics of particular literary subgenres (e.g., satire, farce, parody, allegory, pastoral, epic, elegy, ode) as they relate to theme and purpose ADP H3

Author website: http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/f/jonathan-safran-foer/

The Hunger Games [Book 1]

9780439023528_custom-49e9c33a338d97f0abb78402bcdee9b1103f33a0-s6-c10Bibliographic info

Collins, S. (2010). The hunger games. NY: Scholastic Press.

ISBN: 978-0439023528

Plot Description

Survival is everything to 16-year old Katniss Everdeen, who hails from the 12th district of Panem, the nation that rose from the ashes of post-apocolyptic North America. Each year the decadent and cruel Capitol hosts The Hunger Games, wherein one boy and one girl from each district between the ages of 12 and 18 are chosen to fight to the death in a televised arena event.

When her younger sister Primrose is selected as a tribute, Katniss sacrifices her life by volunteering in her place. Now she and Peeta, the son of the town’s baker and fellow tribute, will have to learn to survive against all odds. In the end, only one can win.

Quantitative Reading Level

ATOS Book Level: 5.3

Interest Level: Middle Grades Plus (MG+ 6 and up)

Lexile: 810L

Qualitative Reading Analysis

This is a highly popular series with current movies in theatres, making it a favorite amongst middle and high schoolers. It’s structural complexity is low, maintaining a single narrator and a chronological storyline. There are levels of meaning and the concepts are pretty complex (dystopian world, death of children), making it inappropriate for ages under upper middle and high school.

Content Area

  • English/Language Arts

Content Area Standard

Objective 1.2.1: The student will determine the contributions of literary elements in classical and contemporary literary texts. ECLG 1.2.1, ADP H
Grades 9 and 10
The student will
 Determine the significance of the following as each contributes to the meaning of a text: 
o plot sequence of events (including foreshadowing and flashback), cause-and-effect relationships, and events 
that are exposition, climax or turning point, resolution* ECLG 1.2.1, ADP H4
o characters’ defining traits, motivations, and developments throughout the text* ECLG 1.2.1, ADP H4
o details that provide clues to the setting, the mood created by the setting, and the role the setting plays in the text* ECLG 1.2.1
o conflicts that motivate characters and those that serve to advance the plot* ECLG 1.2.1
o the perspective of the author or speaker as well as the effects of first or third person narration and multiple narrators within and across text(s)* ECLG 1.2.1
o narration, dialogue, dramatic monologue, asides, soliloquies, and character foils ADP H4 o various literary devices, including figurative language, imagery, allegory, and symbolism
 Identify the specific structural elements of particular literary forms (e.g., short story, novel, drama, poetry, essay, biography, autobiography, journalistic writing, film) ECLG 1.1.5, ADP H3 
Grades 11 and 12
The student will
 Analyze characters’ motivations, actions, and development as they relate to the experiences, emotions, moral dilemmas and ambiguities in a work of literature ADP H8 
 Analyze how voice, persona, and the choice of narrator affect the characterization, mood, tone, plot and credibility of a text 
 Analyze the contribution of dramatic monologue, chorus, asides, soliloquies, and character foils to the development of character, plot, and theme ADP H6 

 Analyze the characteristics of particular literary subgenres (e.g., satire, farce, parody, allegory, pastoral, epic, elegy, ode) as they relate to theme and purpose ADP H3

Curriculum Suggestions

Hunger Games can be looked at as an example of dystopian literature, and in particular the characterizations of heroes and villains, as well as the symbolism in the novel.

Links to Digital Content

 

Awards

  • #1 New York Times Bestseller
  • #1 USA Today Bestseller
  • Wall Street Journal Bestseller
  • Publishers Weekly Bestseller
  • Publishers Weekly’s Best Books of 2008: Children’s Fiction
  • New York Times Notable Children’s Book Of 2008
  • An American Library Association
  • Top Ten Best Books For Young Adults Selection
  • An ALA Notable Children’s Book
  • 2009 ALA Amelia Bloomer Project List
  • #1 On Winter ’08/​’09 Children’s Indie Next List
  • Indies Choice–Best Indie Young Adult Buzz Book Honor
  • 2008 Cybil Award–Fantasy & Science Fiction
  • 2009 Children’s Choice Book Award
  • Teen Choice Book Of The Year Finalist
  • YALSA’s Teens’ Top Ten, 2009
  • NYPL “Stuff For The Teen Age” List, 2009
  • CCBC Choices 2009
  • A New York Times Editors’ Choice
  • A Kirkus Best Book Of 2008
  • A Horn Book Fanfare
  • School Library Journal Best Books Of 2008
  • A Booklist Editors’ Choice, 2008
  • LA Times Favorite Children’s Books, 2008
  • Barnes & Noble Best Books Of 2008: For Teens and Kids
  • Borders Best Books Of 2008: Teens
  • Amazon Best Books Of 2008: Top 100 Editors’ Pick; Top 10 Books: Teens

(from http://www.suzannecollinsbooks.com/the_hunger_games_69765.htm)

Subjects/themes
Politics, Dystopias, Violence, Survival

Guardian

Guardian

Julius Lester

Lester, J. 2008. Guardian. NY: HarperCollins.

9780061558900

Summary

It is 1946 in Davis, Georgia, and it is a time of hatred. Rampant is the racism that is known of the old South, where “negroes” are treated as third-class citizens. 14-year old Ansel witnesses a murder, but the perpetrator is the white son of the richest man in town, Zeph Davis. Zeph blames Ansel’s best friend’s father, a negro, Big Willie, and Ansel doesn’t defend him. This haunts Ansel, and changes everything in his town, from his family to his friends. After the lynching of Big Willie, nothing will ever be the same.

Quantitative Summary:

Lexile: 870L

ATOS Book Level: 5.2

Interest Level:   UG (9-12)

Qualitative Summary:

This book is a short read, and very powerful in its portrayal of hatred and racism. I think in terms of narrative complexity it is a middle-high because the point of view can change between first person and third-omniscient, and studies many characters. The meaning seemed to be middle low – a single level of complex meaning ( a historical look at racism). The language was brutal at times and meant for a high school audience and above.

Curriculum Ties

This book would be great in a US History class when dealing with Civil Rights and historical accounts of racism. I think it would be a good contemporary companion to a book like To Kill a Mockingbird, especially as the main character could be more relatable to a teenager.

Standards

MD CCSS

US History 9-12

INDICATOR

  • 4. Analyze the major developments, controversies and consequences of the civil rights movements from 1968 to 1980 (5.5.4).

English 9-12

Objective 1.2.1: The student will determine the contributions of literary elements in classical and contemporary literary texts. ECLG 1.2.1, ADP H
Grades 9 and 10
The student will
 Determine the significance of the following as each contributes to the meaning of a text: 
o plot sequence of events (including foreshadowing and flashback), cause-and-effect relationships, and events 
that are exposition, climax or turning point, resolution* ECLG 1.2.1, ADP H4
o characters’ defining traits, motivations, and developments throughout the text* ECLG 1.2.1, ADP H4
o details that provide clues to the setting, the mood created by the setting, and the role the setting plays in the text* ECLG 1.2.1
o conflicts that motivate characters and those that serve to advance the plot* ECLG 1.2.1
o the perspective of the author or speaker as well as the effects of first or third person narration and multiple narrators within and across text(s)* ECLG 1.2.1
o narration, dialogue, dramatic monologue, asides, soliloquies, and character foils ADP H4 o various literary devices, including figurative language, imagery, allegory, and symbolism
 Identify the specific structural elements of particular literary forms (e.g., short story, novel, drama, poetry, essay, biography, autobiography, journalistic writing, film) ECLG 1.1.5, ADP H3 
Grades 11 and 12
The student will
 Analyze characters’ motivations, actions, and development as they relate to the experiences, emotions, moral dilemmas and ambiguities in a work of literature ADP H8 
 Analyze how voice, persona, and the choice of narrator affect the characterization, mood, tone, plot and credibility of a text 
 Analyze the contribution of dramatic monologue, chorus, asides, soliloquies, and character foils to the development of character, plot, and theme ADP H6 

 Analyze the characteristics of particular literary subgenres (e.g., satire, farce, parody, allegory, pastoral, epic, elegy, ode) as they relate to theme and purpose ADP H3

Author website: http://members.authorsguild.net/juliuslester/

Notable distinctions:

  • National Book Award Finalist
  • Coretta Scott King Award
  • Newbery Honor Author

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone
J.K. Rowling

Rowling, J. K. 1997. Harry Potter and the sorcerer’s stone. NY: Scholastic Press.

ISBN: 9780590353403

Summary:

Harry Potter is an 11-year old orphan living with unhappily with the Dursleys, his mean Aunt Petunia and Uncle Vernon, as well as their spoiled son Dudley. He hates his life with them, living in a little room under the staircase and suffering daily  torment from Dudley. Then, something strange happens on Dudley’s birthday at the Zoo — it seems Harry could communicate with the python at the Zoo. Even stranger, he seemed to be responsible for the glass suddenly disappearing from the python’s cage.

Then, the letters start coming, first slowly, then all at once, and as much as Harry’s aunt and uncle tried to destroy them, more would arrive. Letters that say that Harry is a wizard and has been accepted into the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. And just when they think they’ve escaped the letters, the lumbering giant Hagrid comes to take Harry away to Hogwarts.

Harry’s first year at Hogwarts is full of adventure and new friends, but it is also shadowed by the rumored return of an all powerful wizard who was responsible for the death of his parents.

Quantitative Summary:

Lexile Measure: 880L

ATOS: 5.5

Interest Level: Middle Grades

Qualitative Summary:

This book is part of a wildly popular and highly merchandized series which makes it a much easier sell, and giving it a wide appeal in age ranges. It uses somewhat complex language, with an invented “wizarding” language woven into the narrative. The book begins with a flash back, but otherwise doesn’t shift the order of events out of chronology.  A singular omniscient narrator tells the story.

Curriculum Tie Ins:

Discussions of characterization are big in this book and would be great to discuss in the English classroom: the characterization of the different houses, the way Voldemort is developed as a villain, and to a lesser extent, the grey area that is Professor Snape. The whole series is good for exploring “coming of age” narratives.

Standards

MD CCSS

English 9-12

Goal 1 Reading, Reviewing and Responding to Texts

The student will demonstrate the ability to respond to a text by employing personal experiences and critical analysis.

EXPECTATION 1.1

The student will use effective strategies before, during, and after reading, viewing, and listening to self-selected and assigned materials.

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.1.1 The student will use pre-reading strategies appropriate to both the text and purpose for reading by surveying the text, accessing prior knowledge, formulating questions, setting purpose(s), and making predictions.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.1.2 The student will use during-reading strategies appropriate to both the text and purpose for reading by visualizing, making connections, and using fix-up strategies such as re-reading, questioning, and summarizing.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.1.3 The student will use after-reading strategies appropriate to both the text and purpose for reading by summarizing, comparing, contrasting, synthesizing, drawing conclusions, and validating the purpose for reading.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.1.4 The student will apply reading strategies when comparing, making connections, and drawing conclusions about non-print text.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.1.5 The student will identify specific structural elements of particular literary forms: poetry, short story, novel, drama, essay, biography, autobiography, journalistic writing, and film.

 

EXPECTATION 1.2

The student will construct, examine, and extend meaning of traditional and contemporary works recognized as having significant literary merit.

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.2.1 The student will consider the contributions of plot, character, setting, conflict, and point of view when constructing the meaning of a text.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.2.2 The student will determine how the speaker, organization, sentence structure, word choice, tone, rhythm, and imagery reveal an author’s purpose.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.2.3 The student will explain the effectiveness of stylistic elements in a text that communicate an author’s purpose.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.2.4 The student will identify and/or explain connections between and among themes and/or styles of two or more texts.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.2.5 The student will extend or further develop meaning by explaining the implications of the text for the reader or contemporary society.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.2.6 The student will extend or further develop meaning by comparing texts presented in different media.

Author’s website: http://www.jkrowling.com

Awards:

  • ALA/YALSA Best Books for Young Adults, 1999
  • ALA/YALSA Best of the Best 100 (Selected from BBYA 1966-99)
  • ALA/YALSA Top Ten Books for Teens, 1999 (Ranked #1)
  • ALA Notable Children’s Books, 1999
  • Book Links Lasting Connections, 1998
  • Booklist Editors’ Choices, 1998
  • Booklist: Top Ten Fantasy Novels for Youth
  • CCBC Choices, 1998: Fiction for Children
  • Publishers Weekly Best Books 1998
  • School Library Journal: Best Books 1998
  • School Library Journal: One Hundred Books that Shaped the Century
  • Parenting magazine: Book of the Year, 1998
  • Parenting magazine: Reading Magic Books, 1998
  • Voice of Youth Advocates: Best Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror, 1998
  • Anne Spencer Lindbergh Prize for Children’s Literature
  • American Booksellers Association Book of the Year (ABBY)
  • CBC Not Just for Children Anymore! List
  • International Reading Association: Children’s Choices, 1999
  • International Reading Association: Teacher’s Choices, 1999
  • National Council of Teachers of English: Notable Children’s Books in the Language Arts, 1999
  • New York Public Library 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing
  • Wisconsin Educational Media Association Golden Archer Award (Middle/Junior High), 2000
  • Sasquatch Reading Award (Washington), 2000
  • Great Stone Face Children’s Book Award (New Hampshire), 2000
  • Arizona Young Reader’s Award, 2000
  • Wyoming Indian Paintbrush Book Award, 2000
  • Nene Award (Hawaii), 2000
  • Rebecca Caudill Young Reader’s Award (Illinois), 2001
  • Michigan Reading Association Readers’ Choice Award, 2001
  • Colorado Blue Spruce Young Adult Book Award, 2001
  • Nominated for the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children’s Literature, 1999
  • Nominated for Children’s Book Award (Massachusetts), 2000
  • Nominated for Children’s Book Award (Utah), 2000
  • Nominated for New York State Charlotte Award, 2000
  • Nominated for Young Reader’s Choice Award (Pacific Northwest Library Association), 2001
  • Nestlé Smarties Book Prize, Gold Medal 9-11 years, 1997
  • FCBG Children’s Book Award, Overall and Longer Novel Category Winner, 1997
  • Birmingham Cable Children’s Book Award, 1997
  • Young Telegraph Paperback of the Year, 1998
  • British Book Awards Children’s Book of the Year (NIBBY), 1997
  • Sheffield Children’s Book Award, 1998
  • Whitaker’s Platinum Book Award, 2001
  • Commended for the 1997 Carnegie Award
  • Shortlisted for the 1997 Guardian Children’s Award
  • W. H. Smith Book of the Year Award, 1997
  • New York State Children’s Choice Award Nominee
  • New York Public Library’s 100 Best Children’s Books from the Last 100 Years

(-http://www.arthuralevinebooks.com/book.asp?bookid=32)

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

fiosThe Fault in Our Stars
by John Green

Green, J. 2012. The fault in our stars. Dutton Books: NY.

ISBN 978-0-525-47881-2

Summary:

Hazel Grace Lancaster knows her final chapter has already been written. A sixteen year old with terminal thyroid cancer, she has accepted her fate. Her mother, however, believes her to be depressed, and along with Hazel’s therapist, encourages her to go to a support group for teens with cancer. It’s there she meets Augustus Waters, the first boy she’s met who can match her wit and intelligence. They bond over her favorite book, An Imperial Affliction, and soon something happens to Hazel that she never saw coming: she falls in love.

Quantitative Summary:

ATOS Book Level: 5.5

Interest Level: Upper Grades (9-12)

Lexile: 850L

Qualitative Review:

John Green is one of those authors who is considered to really have a direct line into the teenage mindset, through his internet ventures and his multiple books. This book is no different, producing a witty account of a teenage girl who is traveling a difficult road with grace and poise, as well as a sense of bitterness over the world that dealt her this hand.

I’d say the meaning was Middle High, as the subject matter is complex, especially with the integration of Van Houten’s minimal story line towards the end. The language is also Middle High, using some complex words. The knowledge demands I think are Middle Low; experiences in the book can be common (love, depression, death), and there are few references to other texts/cultural elements.

Curriculum Tie-ins:

Standards:

MD CCSS

English 9-12

Goal 1 Reading, Reviewing and Responding to Texts

The student will demonstrate the ability to respond to a text by employing personal experiences and critical analysis.

EXPECTATION 1.1

The student will use effective strategies before, during, and after reading, viewing, and listening to self-selected and assigned materials.

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.1.1 The student will use pre-reading strategies appropriate to both the text and purpose for reading by surveying the text, accessing prior knowledge, formulating questions, setting purpose(s), and making predictions.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.1.2 The student will use during-reading strategies appropriate to both the text and purpose for reading by visualizing, making connections, and using fix-up strategies such as re-reading, questioning, and summarizing.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.1.3 The student will use after-reading strategies appropriate to both the text and purpose for reading by summarizing, comparing, contrasting, synthesizing, drawing conclusions, and validating the purpose for reading.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.1.4 The student will apply reading strategies when comparing, making connections, and drawing conclusions about non-print text.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.1.5 The student will identify specific structural elements of particular literary forms: poetry, short story, novel, drama, essay, biography, autobiography, journalistic writing, and film.

 

EXPECTATION 1.2

The student will construct, examine, and extend meaning of traditional and contemporary works recognized as having significant literary merit.

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.2.1 The student will consider the contributions of plot, character, setting, conflict, and point of view when constructing the meaning of a text.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.2.2 The student will determine how the speaker, organization, sentence structure, word choice, tone, rhythm, and imagery reveal an author’s purpose.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.2.3 The student will explain the effectiveness of stylistic elements in a text that communicate an author’s purpose.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.2.4 The student will identify and/or explain connections between and among themes and/or styles of two or more texts.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.2.5 The student will extend or further develop meaning by explaining the implications of the text for the reader or contemporary society.

 

INDICATOR

 

  • 1.2.6 The student will extend or further develop meaning by comparing texts presented in different media.

Author’s website: http://www.johngreenbooks.com

Notable Appearances:

  • #1 New York Times bestseller
  • #1 Wall Street Journal bestseller
  • #9 The Bookseller (UK) bestseller
  • #1 Indiebound bestseller
  • New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice
  • Starred reviews from Booklist, SLJ, Publisher’s Weekly, Horn Book, and Kirkus

(http://johngreenbooks.com/the-fault-in-our-stars/)

PBS.org: American Roots Music

PBS.org: American Roots Music
(http://www.pbs.org/americanrootsmusic/)

Summary

Another website that can be used by both students and teachers, American Roots is a companion site to the PBS mini series of the same name. This website contains lesson plans that can be used with the mini series or independently to teach background history, song mechanics, genres such as gospel and blues, and Native American music. The website also contains transcripts of original interviews with Roots musicians, breakdowns of instrument histories and song histories, and links to more websites about the subject.

Quantitative/Qualitative Summary

The structure of this website is a little complicated to navigate with small text and menus that are not intuitive. Along with some technical language, I think this resource rates as a Middle High level. It is geared towards teachers and educators, but I think older teens could navigate the website and glean information from it.

Curriculum Tie Ins

US History or Music History classes could benefit from the lessons in this website. Elements of Roots/Americana can be compared with the evolution of Blues and Jazz. The social and political eras can also be examined to look at how culture influenced the music and vice-versa. This website could be beneficial with or without the mini series, though having it would certainly give more content to the teacher.

Standards

Role of Music
3.1 Identify the sources of musical genres of the United States, trace the evolution of those genres, and cite well-known musicians associated with them.
3.2 Explain the various roles that musicians perform, identify representative individuals who have functioned in each role, and explain their activities and achievements.

Diversity of Music
3.3 Describe the differences between styles in traditional folk genres within the United States.
3.4 Perform music from various cultures and time periods.
3.5 Classify, by genre or style and historical period or culture, unfamiliar but representative aural examples of music and explain the reasoning for the classification.